Is there a super simple mail client that works on the console that is simpler than mutt? Something like mail(1) but with IMAP and MIME support?

I'm trying to compile aerc. I'm no a #golang person. I wonder: how am I supposed to do this on #Debian, if I'd like to use the Debian packages instead of downloading all these sources from all over the net myself? My main problem, however, is that one of the modules requires Go 1.13 and my Debian variant offers Go 1.11.6. :blobsad:

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@kensanata As a former Debian-loving sysadmin, installing Go from source seems icky, but you install it in your $HOME and use the apt-provided Go to bootstrap installation and as a source for man pages.

@alrs @kensanata Did you change job away from sysadmining, or fall out of love with Debian?

@alrs @kensanata What caused the "break up"? I am slowly realising that, actually, I don't like Debian all that much. I run it mostly because it is the only distro I know which indulges my complete lack of interest in running up to date software (beyond security patches).

@solderpunk @kensanata Mostly all the Redhat and GNOME stuff getting muscled in that broke menu system, introduced PA, brought in systemd. Seeing good people driven out of the project.

@alrs @solderpunk Hm, I guess I don’t mind that much, as a end user. I was never all that invested in the details of what they’re using, I just liked how apt mostly always worked. And I want to use the same OS on the server and on the laptop. If I want to get back to a world I understand I imagine myself going back to Slackware. (It focuses on KDE I guess?)

@kensanata @alrs My main complaints are: ridiculous plurality of packaging tools (do I use apt-get or apt-cache or aptitude or dpkg to do X?), ridiculous splitting of packages (foo, foo-config, foo-doc), over-zealous designation of packages as "required" or "recommended" leading to bloat being pulled in, substantial modifications to upstream software (e.g. splitting up config file sections into separate files) and, yeah, systemd.

I have considered Slackware, but from what I understand the dominant philosophy there is "just install the entire standard system", and I strongly prefer a minimal base install and installing only what I need via a good (simple!) package manager.

Recently I played with Alpine linux in a VM (somewhat ironic, as I have no interest in containers, which seems to be its main niche) and kind of liked what I saw. I might be a tad too minimalistic for a typical desktop, but TBH I am thinking of giving up on that notion and doubling down on the minimalist retrogrouch thing.

@solderpunk @kensanata @alrs you might like Void Linux, it comes pretty bare bones and doc is pretty good. It does not use systemd which is a good thing or not. It’s one of the recent distros I liked before taking the BSD route.

@julienxx @solderpunk @kensanata Now that I do Go I guess I could run any Linux distro. Void sounds like it's loaded up with drama, though.

@alrs @solderpunk @kensanata yeah distros have become less and less meaningful it seems, everything is kinda the same across the current deb and rpm world and the others don’t necessarily bring much value either... just a matter of taste I suppose

@solderpunk @kensanata Alpine uses musl, which is a no-go for me. I switched from Slackware to Debian in '98 for the well-maintained packages that stay updated without being on a version treadmill.

@alrs @kensanata That's exactly what's kept me on it for close to 10 years now.

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